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Asked by someone from TX on 2/24/2017
Henry Hebeler
Henry Hebeler,  says
I believe that splitting it is a good idea, but it may also depend on the costs and available funds from the providers. If your 401(k) funds have high costs, consider saving 7% in either a regular IRA and/or a Roth from Vanguard or perhaps Fidelity where you can get low cost index funds. Whether to use a Roth or not also depends on what you think ... (Read More)
Asked by someone from OR on 2/23/2017
Steve Chen
Steve Chen,  says
It probably will not since an inheritance does not count as income. You can read a similar question here: https://www.newretirement.com/answers/11790/can-an-inheritance-affect-social-security-benefits.aspx (Read More)
Asked by someone from CT on 2/23/2017
Steve Chen
Steve Chen,  says
Since a reverse mortgage is a non-recourse loan the family is not responsible if the mortgage amount exceeds the value of the house. You can read more in these two ... (Read More)
Asked by someone from KY on 2/16/2017
Steve Chen
Steve Chen,  says
Based on your date of birth your full retirement age is 66. If you take Social Security before that, then: "We use the following earnings limits to reduce your benefits: If you are under full retirement age for the entire year, we deduct $1 from your benefit payments for every $2 you earn above the annual limit. For 2016 that limit is ... (Read More)
Asked by someone from IN on 2/9/2017
Steve Chen
Steve Chen,  says
You can get health care quotes here: https://www.newretirement.com/supplemental-health-marketplace.aspx (Read More)
Asked by a 63 year old woman from MA on 2/3/2017
Steve Chen
Steve Chen,  says
Based on your date of birth your full retirement age is 66. If you take Social Security before that, then: "We use the following earnings limits to reduce your benefits: If you are under full retirement age for the entire year, we deduct $1 from your benefit payments for every $2 you earn above the annual limit. For 2016 that limit is ... (Read More)

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