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Asked by a 64 year old man from NJ on 3/24/2015
Personal Financial Planning Department
Personal Financial Planning Department, CFP says
Since you were born between 1943 and 1954, your Full Retirement Age is 66. Your Full Retirement Age of 66 is when you can receive your entire normal benefit without any reduction or increase. For every year that you do not take your benefit after your Full Retirement Age (66), you have an 8% increase of your benefits. The latest that you can wait ... (Read More)
Asked by someone from OH on 3/19/2015
Henry Hebeler
Henry Hebeler,  says
I do not believe they were. You can find out if you go to www.ssa.gov and get your earnings history that is used to determine the amount of Social Security you can get. (Read More)
Asked by someone from OH on 3/21/2015
Henry Hebeler
Henry Hebeler,  says
I do not know of a way to do this. (Read More)
Asked by a 66 year old man from KS on 3/23/2015
Henry Hebeler
Henry Hebeler,  says
No, she will not. For example if she was 62 when starting she would get about a third instead of half. (Read More)
Asked by someone from TN on 3/19/2015
Steve Chen
Steve Chen,  says
Social Security is based on your highest earning 35 years of work - so since you have over 35 years of work the lower earning years will not hurt you. Delaying claiming will only help increase your monthly benefit. You can model out the impact here: https://www.newretirement.com/Services/Social_Security_Start_Age_Calculator.aspx You may ... (Read More)
Asked by a 55 year old man from VA on 3/21/2015
Steve Chen
Steve Chen,  says
We haven't compared their assumptions to ours - this is probably a question that Intuit/Quicken is better suited to answer. Good luck! Any feedback on our calculator is appreciated https://www.newretirement.com/retirement-calculator/ (Read More)

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