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Asked by someone from CA on 10/15/2014
Henry Hebeler
Henry Hebeler,  says
If you are asking about how much you can make without losing a good deal of your Social Security, it's less than about $15,000 if you are not yet 65. At 65 you can make about $50,000, and after 66 any amount, but the amounts will change every year, and you can find the specifics on www.ssa.gov. If you are asking about income taxes, you have to ... (Read More)
Asked by someone from KS on 10/20/2014
Henry Hebeler
Henry Hebeler,  says
Highly unlikely, but it might be worth the try. Give Medicare a call. (Read More)
Asked by someone from CA on 10/17/2014
Steve Chen
Steve Chen,  says
Typically people receive about ~32% more if they wait until their maximum retirement age (70) vs. their full retirement age. Age 62 - you get ~ 75% of what you would get at your Full Retirement age ~ 65-67 depending on your year of birth Age 70 - you get ~ 132% of what you would get at your Full Retirement age You can learn more ... (Read More)
Asked by someone from NC on 10/13/2014
Steve Chen
Steve Chen,  says
This article and section on Social Security also provides some background on your question: http://www.newretirement.com/Services/Social-Security-Spousal-Benefits.aspx (Read More)
Asked by a 67 year old man from RI on 10/19/2014
Steve Chen
Steve Chen,  says
It also depends on your tax situation, what your expected return is for the money if you were to invest it and your appetite for risk. Given today's low interest rates and relatively higher returns in the stock market you could potentially make a case for having a mortgage and then investing if you have a longer time horizon. You may want to ... (Read More)
Asked by someone from FL on 10/17/2014
Personal Financial Planning Department
Personal Financial Planning Department, CFP says
Unfortunately your wife cannot receive both benefits, but she can receive the highest benefit available. The tier 1 portion of the Railroad Retirement annuity is reduced by any social security entitlement. The reduction follows social security law and limits the individual to the higher of any available benefit. This means that your wife can only ... (Read More)

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